Help & Downloads

Viruses & Malware

What are trojan horses?


Trojan horses are software that appear to provide a useful function but actually install additional software which allows unauthorised access to a computer. This is usually to allow a hacker remote access to a computer.




What is a computer worm?


A worm is a self-replicating computer program which use either a network or the Internet to spread autonomously.




What is malware?


Malware is short for malicious software and is designed to infiltrate a computer without consent. It is a general term used to cover a variety of nasty software such as viruses, spyware, adware and trojan horses.




What is spyware?


Spyware is a kind of malware that is installed on a computer and collects information about a user without their knowledge. This includes Internet surfing habits. Spyware is usually well hidden from the user and normally difficult to detect. Spyware can also interfere with the computers normal operations such as installing unwanted software and redirecting web browser requests. It can also result in a changed Internet browser home page and also slow computer and Internet activity.





Services

What is remote access?


Remote Access allows our technician to access your computer
• The technician cannot access your PC without your express consent.
• The technician cannot collaborate with you without your express consent.
• No third-party programs will be installed on your PC.
• It is not possible for data to be removed from your PC unnoticed and without authorisation.
• You can end the remote session at any time.




Spiny Disk v Solid State Drive - Hard Drives


The difference between hard drives and solid-state drives is in the technology used to store and retrieve data. The table below illustrates some of the differences. HDDs are cheaper and you can get more storage space. SSDs, however, are faster, lighter, more durable, and use less energy. Your needs will dictate which storage drive will work best for you. Find out about the benefits of solid-state drives. Since SSDs have no moving parts, they run considerably more quietly, enjoy faster access time, and lower power consumption over hard disk drives. And better reliability developments have made SSDs as durable as disk drives.





Downloads

Microsoft Support


Find Microsoft downloads and more Microsoft Download Centre





Security

Tips for Strong, Secure Passwords & Other Authentication Tools


Never give out your password to anyone.* Never give it to friends, even if they’re really good friends. A friend can – maybe even accidentally – pass your password along to others or even become an ex-friend and abuse it. Don’t just use one password. It’s possible that someone working at a site where you use that password could pass it on or use it to break into your accounts at other sites. Newest advice: Use a pass phrase. Security experts are now recommending a “pass phrase” rather than simply a password. Such a phrase should be relatively long – perhaps 20 characters or so and consist of seemingly random words strung together along with numbers, symbols and upper and lower case letters. Think of something that you can remember but others couldn’t guess such as YellowChocolate#56CadillacFi$h. that’s relatively long – perhaps 20 characters or so — using seemingly random words strung together along with numbers, symbols and upper and lower case letters. Think of something that you can remember but others couldn’t guess such as YellowChocolate#56CadillacFi$h. Avoid using famous quotations that might be easy to guess. Make the password at least 12 characters long. The longer the better. Longer passwords are harder for thieves to crack. Include numbers, capital letters and symbols. Consider using a $ instead of an S or a 1 instead of an L, or including an & or % – but note that $1ngle is NOT a good password. Password thieves are onto this. But Mf$J1ravng (short for “My friend Sam Jones is really a very nice guy) is an excellent password. Don’t post it in plain sight. This might seem obvious but studies have found that a lot of people post their password on their monitor with a sticky note. Bad idea. If you must write it down, hide the note somewhere where no one can find it. Consider using a password manager. Programs or web services like RoboForm (Windows only) or Lastpass (Windows and Mac) let you create a different very strong password for each of your sites. But you only have to remember the one password to access the program or secure site that stores your passwords for you. Consider using multi-factor authentication. Many services offer an option to verify your identity if someone logs on to your account from an unrecognized device. The typical method is to send a text or other type of message to a mobile device registered to you with a code you need to type in to verity it’s really you. In most cases, you will not be required to use this code when logging on from a known device such as your own computer, tablet or phone. Don’t fall for “phishing” attacks. Be very careful before clicking on a link (even if it appears to be from a legitimate site) asking you to log in, change your password or provide any other personal information. It might be legit or it might be a “phishing” scam where the information you enter goes to a hacker. When in doubt, log on manually by typing what you know to be the site’s URL into your browser window. Make sure your devices are secure. The best password in the world might not do you any good if someone is looking over your shoulder while you type or if you forget to log out on a cybercafe computer. Malicious software, including “keyboard loggers” that record all of your keystrokes, has been used to steal passwords and other information. To increase security, make sure you’re using up-to-date anti-malware software and that your operating system is up-to-date. Use a “password” or fingerprints for your phone too. Most phones can be locked so that the only way to use them is to type in a code, typically a string of numbers or maybe a pattern you draw on the screen. Some new phones allow you to register fingerprints, which are quite secure. Sometimes when people with bad intentions find unlocked phones, they use them to steal the owners’ information, make a lot of calls, or send texts that look like they’re coming from the owner. Someone posing as you could send texts that make it look like you’re bullying or harassing someone in your address book with inappropriate images or words. * Some parents ask their kids to share their passwords with them. This might be OK with young children, but you might want to respect your teen’s privacy and not ask. Also, if you do ask your children for their passwords, make sure they understand that this is a rare exception to the “do not share password” rule. For more information visit Connect Safely




Helping parents keep their children safe online


Supporting families online Get expert support and practical tips to help children benefit from connected technology and the internet safely and smartly. Visit https://www.internetmatters.org for more information about being safe online





How 2

How to refresh, reset, or restore your PC


If you're having problems with your PC, you can: Refresh your PC to reinstall Windows and keep your personal files and settings. Refresh also keeps the apps that came with your PC and the apps you installed from the Microsoft Store. Reset your PC to reinstall Windows but delete your files, settings, and apps—except for the apps that came with your PC. Restore your PC to undo recent system changes you've made. If you're having trouble starting (booting) your PC, see Windows Startup Settings (including safe mode), and go to the “Get to Windows Startup Settings in the Windows Recovery Environment” section. You can refresh, reset, or restore your PC from the Windows Recovery Environment. If you want to back up and restore your personal files using File History, see Set up a drive for File History. Before you start to refresh or reset your PC In most cases, once you start to refresh or reset your PC, it’ll finish on its own. However, if Windows needs missing files, you’ll be asked to insert recovery media, which is typically on a DVD disc or thumb drive. If that happens, what you’ll need depends on your PC. If your PC came with Windows 8.1 or Windows RT 8.1, you’ll need the discs or thumb drive that came with your PC. Check the info that came with your PC to see if your PC manufacturer provided these discs or media. In some cases, you might have created them when you first set up your PC. If you don’t have either of those, you can make them if you have a USB thumb drive of 16 GB or larger. Having a recovery drive can help you troubleshoot and fix problems with your PC, even if it won’t start. For more info, see Create a USB recovery drive. If you upgraded your PC to Windows 8.1 or Windows RT 8.1 with a DVD, use that disc. If you don’t have Windows 8.1 or Windows RT 8.1 media, contact Microsoft Support. Refresh, reset, or restore Select any of the following for more detailed info.